Friday Free For All: Using Water Wisely

Well, it’s happening already. The Mid-Atlantic gardening region is dry. Granted, we have 1″-2″ of rain expected this weekend but the rain has been pretty negligible in central Virginia since the middle of March. I hope that this isn’t a sign of things to come this summer. My mind has been churning about how much water we use. Not just my family or community but as a nation…as a world. Water is a renewable resource but that doesn’t mean that we can use it with reckless abandon. Let’s delve deeper to look at how we can use water more wisely in our gardens.

  1. Hugelkultur – if you’ve been reading my posts for a while, you know that I am big fan of hugelkultur. It just makes sense…use wood that nature has provided for us to help plants through the dry spells. Check out the link for more information if you’re unfamiliar with the practice of hugelkultur.
  2. Reduce your plants dependence on irrigation – while it is vitally important to make sure that newly transplanted plants are watered until they can get their roots in the ground, it is generally not necessary to water them for the rest of their lives. We had an extreme drought in 2010 here in central Virginia and emergency water restrictions were put in place; those restrictions meant that you couldn’t water…at all. One of the reservoirs that feed our public water supply, Lake Chesdin, was all but reduced to a pond. It was truly an amazing sight to see. During that drought, guess how many times I watered, even before the emergency water restrictions were in place. Zero. Zip. Nada. I am of the mindset that my plants will either live or die trying. I don’t have the desire or time to water them regularly. So do you know what they do to compensate for my lack of interest? They send their roots further into the ground to search for their own water. For the record, I didn’t lose one plant during the drought either.

    using water wisely

    Lake Chesdin 2010 Photo courtesy of Richard MacDonald

  3. Water wisely – for those newly transplanted plants, get creative with your watering. For trees, water slowly and deeply to make sure that the rootball is being wet thoroughly. You can accomplish this in several ways. One way is by using a treegator. These are available in either donut shapes for multi-stemmed trees or upright bags that zip shut around the tree trunk. You fill them with water and the water drips out slowly and wets the rootball. If you want to make your own cheap tree gator, get a few 5-gallon buckets and drill tiny holes in the bottom. Set them around the base of the tree and fill them with water. The water will trickle out slowly and water the rootball. You can also just let the hose run at a trickle for a half hour or so at the base of the tree.using water wisely
  4. Mulch – mulching your garden will help to reduce evaporation and regulate soil temperature, both of which will reduce your plants need for water. Mulch should be applied 2″-4″ thick. If you apply it thicker, you will reduce the amount of oxygen that is penetrating into the soil and that will impair the plants’ root growth. For heaven’s sake, don’t end up with mulch volcanoes around your trees!
  5. Apply compost – this is such an important part of using water wisely. By adding compost, you are improving soil structure. By improving your soil structure, your sandy soil is able to hold more moisture and your clay soil begins to open up to allow water in. Adding compost is the magic ingredient that makes all of the other items we discussed today possible.

 

So what will you do in your garden to use water wisely this summer? There are many other ways to reduce your water usage and I’d love to hear what you are doing. Leave me a comment below or e-mail me at stacey@midatlanticgardening.com. Happy Friday and happy gardening!

April 20, 2012Permalink Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *